A crocodile is any species belonging to the family Crocodylidae (sometimes classified instead as the subfamily Crocodylinae). The term can also be used more loosely to include all extant members of the order Crocodilia: i.e. the true crocodiles, the alligators and caimans (family Alligatoridae) and the gharials (family Gavialidae), as well as the Crocodylomorpha which includes prehistoric crocodile relatives and ancestors.
             Crocodiles start their life at around 20 centimeters (7.9 in) long. The largest crocodile ever held in captivity is an Estuarine–Siamese hybrid named Yai (born 10 June 1972) at the famous Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo, Thailand. This animal measures 6 m (19.69 ft) (19 ft 8 in) in length and weighs 1114.27 kg. There is no reliable way of measuring crocodile age, although several techniques are used to derive a reasonable guess. The most common method is to measure lamellar growth rings in bones and teeth—each ring corresponds to a change in growth rate which typically occurs once a year between dry and wet seasons.[19] Bearing these inaccuracies in mind, the oldest crocodilians appear to be the largest
species. C. porosus is estimated to live around 70 years on average, and there is limited evidence that some individuals may exceed 100 years.
               The crocodile’s blood contains extremely powerful antibodies, which basically destroys everything that could be a threat to health. Australian aboriginals have used Crocodile oil for thousands of years to reduce arthritis pain, and enhance joint movement. Oil of crocodile is extraordinary for high-penetration.

A Crocodile



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